The eating of chicken soup is almost as old as the domestication of chickens themselves, which may have taken place as many as 10,000 years ago! Most every part of the world has its own regional variations on this staple, like Mexico’s sopa de Fideos, China’s QiguoJi, Iraqi Shorba Bi Djaj and Indian Marag.

[If you're already hungry, click here to skip to the recipes!]

However, prototypical American chicken soup, which tends to contain mostly root vegetables to bolster its poultry, seems to have been brought over by Scottish and Polish immigrants.

They in turn seem to have picked it up from Mennonite, Amish and Jewish communities around Europe. The most distinctly American alteration to chicken soup was the addition of corn, which we'd picked up as a foodstuff from neighboring Native Americans.

Chicken is an especially popular food choice and cold remedy in the Jewish community, earning it the nickname "Jewish Penicillin." Some Jewish communities also maintain a tradition of whipping up chicken soup as their last meal before they undertake their yearly fast on Yom Kippur.

In fact, chicken soup is so associated with healing of both body and mind that an inspirational book series called Chicken Soup For The Soul now boasts over 250 titles! Plus, research suggests that chicken soup is not only sought out by those coping with colds but with breakups and hangovers!

This chart illustrates our belief in chicken soup's powers by comparing the number of cold and flu appointments made on the online medical care appointment booking service Zocdoc with the number of soup orders made on food delivery service Grubhub.

Could this almost-universal enthusiasm for chicken soup mean that its healing powers are all they're cracked up to be? Tentatively, the answer seems to be yes!

Studies dating back to 1978 have found that chicken soup proved more effective than both hot and cold water at clearing congested nasal passages, with many others echoing them since.

One study also found that chicken soup inhibited inflammation by preventing the migration of immune cells called neutrophils, which are one of the chief causes of excess mucus production. Some also pin chicken soup's illness-fighting properties on amino acid-based carnosine, which has been shown to help fight the flu virus.

On a somewhat less plausible note, the 12th century Jewish philosopher Maimonides suggested that chicken soup was was even rumored to be able to cure leprosy.

Chicken is also a good source of immune-boosting Vitamin B6, and that's before we even get to the plentiful vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that you'll find in our other suggested ingredients of tomatoes, celery, onions, garlic, and lemon.

However, chicken soup changed for the worse in 1934, when ubiquitous company Campbell first began adding noodles to its version of chicken soup. Unfortunately, this "chicken soup," iconic as it may be, has a whole lot of problems.

campbell’s

For one thing, low-nutrient white-flour noodles are a poor substitute for hearty, filling veggies. Then, though a can of Campbell's Chicken Noodle soup is admittedly low in fat and calories, it's also surprisingly low in protein; most all of the soup's calorie content comes from the noodles' simple carbohydrates.

This is unsurprising given that actual chicken meat makes up less than two percent of this "chicken" soup. So while a one-can serving of Campbell soup provides only two grams of protein, one serving of any of the recipes below will provide over 30!

Then, though Campbell seems to have eliminated the MSG (monosodium glutamate) from its major players, their noodle soup still contains mysterious "flavoring" that could be more or less anything under the sun.

Finally, a can of Campbell's will provide you with a whopping 37 percent of your daily recommended dose of sodium; we reduce the level of this sneaky mineral while still maintaining plenty of flavor by adding in a ton of incredible herbs and spices in its place.

If you find yourself missing your preferred pasta, you could always substitue a serving of konjac noodles, or, if in phase three, fill your meal out with other veggies like zucchinis, mushrooms, and cauliflower.

One last word of warning: our Chicken Meatball Soup, Savory Chicken Soup, and Hot And Sour Chicken Soup all contain a little cayenne, which is great for your metabolism but may be something to be wary of if you're not a spicy food person!

chicken soup

Chicken Meatball Soup

>Chicken Meatball Soup

Meatballs aren't just for spaghetti! Why not soup them up? Estimated nutritional value of 224 calories, 4g fat, 63 mg cholesterol, 10.2 carbohydrates, 1.8 g fiber, 39.3 protein, and 4 g sugar.

Prep Time
10 minutes
Cook time
30 Minutes
Yield
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable, 1 Melba toast)

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken meatball recipe
  • 2 cups homemade chicken broth (or substitute 1 cup water for 1 cup broth)
  • 2 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
  • Chopped celery or tomato
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped onion
  • 2 cloves garlic crushed and minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Cayenne pepper to taste
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions
Combine ground chicken breast with spices, chopped garlic, onion, and crushed Melba toast. Form into balls. Bring broth to a boil; add spices, vinegar, Bragg’s liquid aminos, and chicken balls. Reduce to a simmer and cook a minimum of 30 minutes adding the celery or tomato the last 5-10 minutes of cooking.

Recipe provided by


Savory Chicken Soup

savory chicken soup

This easy soup is sure to fill you up! Estimated nutritional value of 244 calories, 6g fat, 64 mg cholesterol, 13.3 g carbohydrate, 3.2g fiber, 33.3g protein, 6.8 g sugar.

Prep Time
10 minutes
Cook time
30 minutes
Yield
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)

Ingredients

  • 100 grams chicken breast cubed
  • 1-2 cups chopped celery or tomatoes
  • 2 cups chicken broth (or substitute 1 cup water for 1 cup of broth)
  • 1 tablespoon minced onion
  • 2 cloves garlic crushed and sliced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ½ teaspoon organic poultry spice blend
  • Cayenne pepper to taste
  • Salt and black pepper to taste

Directions
Bring chicken stock to a boil. Add onion, garlic and spices. Add chicken and vegetables and simmer on low heat for 20 minutes or more until chicken is tender and fully cooked. Serve hot. Sprinkle with chives or parsley if desired.

Recipe provided by

Hot And Sour Chicken Soup

%img description%

This healthy soup has an Asian twist, a great taste, and no health downsides! Estimated nutritional value of 198 calories, 0.5g fat. 64mg cholesterol, 9.6g carbohydrate, 2.9g fiber, 33.2 g protein, and 3g sugar.

Prep Time
10 minutes
Cook time
30 minutes
Yield
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Ingredients

  • 100 grams chicken breast diced
  • 1 cup homemade chicken broth
  • 1 cup water
  • 4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
  • ½ lemon in quarters with rind
  • 1 clove garlic crushed and minced
  • 2 tablespoons minced onion
  • Cayenne pepper to taste
  • Pinch of chili powder or red chili flakes
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Stevia to taste (optional)

Directions
Boil lemon wedges with rind in 1 cup of water until pulp comes out of the rind. Scrape out additional pulp and juice. Add the diced chicken, spices and chicken broth. Simmer until cooked. Variation: You can add orange juice as an option (before 12 pm if on phase 2) and your choice of approved vegetable or substitute shrimp for chicken.

Phase 3/Maintenace Modifications
Add a small amount of fresh pineapple juice. Add vegetables such as zucchini, cauliflower, small amount of carrots etc. Add a little chili oil or paste to the soup for added heat and flavor.

Recipe provided by

Want to get in shape for 2020? Join our Facebook support group and learn about 123 Diet from other community members!

Message Us Message Us